louis vuitton debuts second generation tambour horizon luxury smartwatch

pairing high-end luxury with leading technology, the new louis vuitton tambour horizon luxury smartwatch could cost between 2,250-8,500 USD.

The post louis vuitton debuts second generation tambour horizon luxury smartwatch appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

Source: designboom

8 Unexpected Career Paths for Graphic Designers

As graphic designers, we often have to wear multiple hats and  work on numerous things, like marketing, advertising, designing to name a few. Advancements in technology have drastically changed this industry, and to keep up with the changes, in addition to being the jacks of all trades, graphic designers today have to be specialized in their skills and find a niche that is relevant to their work. Just because you studied graphic design in school doesn’t mean that you have to be a graphic designer. You’d be surprised to know that there are a lot of other job opportunities open to people with artistic flair. Familiarizing yourself with the different options that are available to you will help you shape your future career path. In the article, we will be exploring the many choices you may not be aware of and how they can help inspire your creative career.

1. Creative services manager

Creative services managers are usually paired with design talent and management skills. They usually act as a liaison between management teams and creative professionals. They have to make sure the projects are completed on time and budget is honored. They usually are experienced creative professionals or graphic designers who were promoted from the ranks of junior designers. They don’t work on creative production tasks on a day to day basis but are able to handle hands-on design jobs when needed. They work in both managing marketing teams and promoting their products and services.

2. Email marketing manager

The content of an email, its length and send times are all factors in determining the company’s success. Email marketing professionals are people who are tasked with sending out engaging email communications for an organization. They work closely with a team of copywriters, marketing managers, and UI specialists. They usually have to have a basic understanding of the principles of design and learn HTML, CSS to be able to design an effective email.

3. UI Designer

UI designers help create beautiful interfaces that connect users to a device. To be able to create an effective and engaging site layout, they would have to understand the fundamentals of visual design. They usually would have to work closely with the development team to build interactive web applications. They are responsible for creating a good user experience while interacting with a web or mobile application. UI designers focus on the surface level of an interface while UX designers work on the back end processes.

4.Web Designer

Graphic designers are well suited for web design. They can also be done by creative professionals who are visually savvy. Besides having a strong aesthetic understanding, it is also important for them to be able to code. As web designers, you often end up working with web design and development teams to create and build a website. Professionals in this industry end up working for a company in creating and maintaining their website or for a collective that specializes in creating websites for a number of different companies. Its often advised finding your niche as a web designer and companies prefer designers who are able to design and build your web applications.

5. Art Director

Art directors usually have years of experience working as graphic designers or other creative fields. They are responsible for creating the overall feel and mood of the project or campaign. This requires them to have incredible attention to detail as they would have to make sure every element of the design fits in with the overall vision of the project. They usually work with a team of creative professionals and guide and lead them to create different elements of the design. They are responsible for creating the vision for the marketing campaigns, advertisements and other brand imagery for the company. It takes years of practice to inspire and educate your team and your clients.

6. Packaging designer

Packaging designers have to determine the best packaging for the product they are designing – from materials used for the design, its structural form, ease of opening and environmental concerns should be taken into consideration when designing a package. Graphic designers and illustrators with a foundation in design are ideally the best candidates for this career opportunity. Packaging designers are always on the lookout for the best and creative ways to package a product. To market a product effectively, it requires them to make engaging artworks for their packaging.

7. Book designer

Printed pages are still very popular among book lovers all over the world. This means that there is a high demand for eye-catching book covers that will draw in potential readers. They are also responsible for designing and developing every element of the book except its content. Authors and writers create the actual storyline while book designers create the physical product. They design book covers, pick typography, craft end pages and convey the author’s message using the overall design of the book.

8. Instructor/Teacher

A high number of students who graduate out of graphic design schools go on to become lecturers. After years of experience in the field, they are usually ready to offer their expertise and learning to the next generation of budding designers. Graphic design instructors may teach at high schools, community colleges and career colleges training students in graphic design and other related programs. Teachers usually are tasked with not only following the teaching curriculum but also to inspire, engage and challenge the students — this means that they should be able to create a class environment bursting with creative energy.

Interested in any of the above? If you are looking to switch careers, it is a great time to start thinking about it now. This will help you forge a career path by choosing a specialty that you think you will be good at. There are so many ways to grow as a graphic designer. Being aware of the different opportunities you have will help you make an informed decision and forge a career path that you think will help you the most.

The post 8 Unexpected Career Paths for Graphic Designers appeared first on Line25.

Source: line25

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

AoiroStudioFeb 11, 2019

This is a game prototype that I would love to share on ABDZ, it’s a prototype (soon-to-be-released) designed by Sylvain Theyssens, Anthony Meric and Oleg Pashkovsky. First, the game is all about timing as I quote: “You are given only ninety nine seconds to succeed. The more you play, the fastest you become, and further you can go”. Interesting concept right? Now let’s take a closer look at the interactions, they are quite subtle especially on the UI but it gets quite creative with the game itself. It will be interesting to give it a try when it will become available.

Links

Interaction Design

Interaction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game PrototypeInteraction Design: Ninety Nine Seconds Game Prototype

Credits


Source: abduzeedo

evian launches reusable water bottle collaboration with virgil abloh

a white, protective silicone sleeve features ‘evian’ branding printed in gray, and ‘RAINBOW INSIDE’ written vertically within abloh’s signature quotation marks.

The post evian launches reusable water bottle collaboration with virgil abloh appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

Source: designboom

How to Create a School Newsletter Template in InDesign

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

A newsletter is a mini-magazine that turns out to be really cost effective. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to create an InDesign newsletter template.

In the education world, it’s common to send parents an update on the community, and this clean and versatile design serves as a parent newsletter template. If you are a high-school student and are running the editorial department, this school newsletter template is easy to edit too! Great if you are looking to start with InDesign. If you are running any business and want to let your customers know of the latest products or news, this newsletter also serves as a weekly newsletter template. You can add multiple pages to this project if you are looking to send out a monthly newsletter—it’s very easy! 

For this tutorial, we will be using a letter size newsletter format. You will learn how to set up master pages, in case you want to add more than four pages to your newsletter design. We will create styles for the different typographic hierarchy levels that are necessary to create an attractive classroom newsletter template. Using a three-column grid newsletter layout will allow you and your clients to easily customize this InDesign newsletter template. It’s that easy! 

In a hurry? We’ve got amazing print-based InDesign newsletter templates over at Envato Elements and other newsletter design ideas at GraphicRiver. Go check them out! 

What You Will Need

You’ll need access to Adobe InDesign. If you don’t have the software, you can download a trial from the Adobe website. You’ll also need the following assets:

Download the assets and make sure the font is installed on your system before starting. When you are ready, we can dive in! 

1. Setting Up Your Newsletter Template Design

Step 1

In InDesign, go to File > New. Name the document Newsletter Template. We will create a letter size newsletter template design. Set the file to the following dimensions:

  • Width to 0.5 in
  • Height to 11 in 
  • Orientation to Portrait
  • Units to Inches
  • Pages to 4
  • Check Facing Pages
  • Number of Columns to 3
  • Gutter to 0.25 in
  • Margins: set the Top and Bottom margins to 0.875 in and the Inside and Outside margins to 0.5 in
  • Bleeds to 0.125 in (it’s best to seek your professional printer’s preference)

Click Create.

create a new indesign file

Step 2

Head over to Window > Color > Swatches to expand the Swatches panel. Choose New Color Swatch button from the main menu. Set the Swatch Name and values to the following: 

  • Light Blue: C=65 M=17 Y=12 K=0 
  • Orange Red: C=0 M=90 Y=100 K=0
  • Newsprint: C=0 M=0 Y=5 K=10

Click Add and OK after you input each color value.

add color swatches

Step 3

For this tutorial, we will create a list of Paragraph Styles that we will use to format key parts of the newsletter template. Head over to Window > Styles > Paragraph Styles to open the Paragraph Styles panel. 

In the main menu, select New Paragraph Style, and set the Style Name to Folio. Folios can consist of several elements. In this tutorial, we will focus on page numbers and ‘School Newsletter.’ The latter can be updated to your school or business name. Select the Basic Character Formats option from the left side menu. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Regular
  • Size: 8 pt

Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Running Head. Running heads are great to point out the different sections in a newsletter. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 8 pt
add paragraph styles

Step 4

Let’s set styles for the rest of the typographical hierarchy elements in the newsletter template. 

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Head. We will be using this style for headlines. This is the most important element in your newsletter layout. Readers will read this first as they browse through the pages. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 30 pt
  • Leading: 34 pt

Select the Character Color option from the left side menu. Set the color to the Light Blue swatch. Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Head-Short Story. Short story articles are great if you need to fill in some small spaces in your newsletter template design. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 14 pt
  • Leading: Auto

Select the Character Color option from the left side menu. Set the color to the Red Orange swatch. Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Deck. Decks describe very briefly what the reader can expect from the article. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Light
  • Size: 18 pt
  • Leading: Auto

Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Byline. Bylines or credit lines are used in different places around the page—most commonly at the beginning of the story to credit the author or photographer/illustrator. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 8 pt
  • Leading: 30 pt

Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Body Copy. Body copy is the largest and most important text setting for the entire newsletter template design. Make sure it is legible as this is one of the elements that can put your readers off. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Regular
  • Size: 8 pt
  • Leading: 11 pt

Select the Indents and Spacing option from the left side menu. Set the Alignment to Left Justify. Set the First Line Indent to 0.125 in. Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Caption. Captions are placed under images and should work together as a single unit. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Regular
  • Size: 6 pt
  • Leading: Auto

Click OK.

Add a new Paragraph Style and set the Style Name to Pull-quote. Pull interesting parts out of the story to emphasize them. Pull-quotes are nice elements that can break up text-heavy body copy and create an interesting layout. Use the following settings:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Medium
  • Size: 14 pt
  • Leading: Auto

Select the Indents and Spacing option from the left side menu. Set the Alignment to Center. Select the Character Color option from the left side menu. Set the color to the Light Blue swatch. Click OK.

add paragraph styles according to the typographical hierarchy elements

Step 5

Drop caps add personality to your design while letting your readers easily see the beginning of the story. The style should be something different than the body copy and headline. For this tutorial, we will be using a red color to make it stand out. To create a drop cap style, we need to create a Character Style. 

Head over to Window > Styles > Character Styles. On the Character Styles panel, select New Character Style from the main menu. Set the Style Name to Drop Cap. Select the Basic Character Formats option from the left side menu.

Set the Font Family to Bw Nista Grotesk and the Font Style to ExtraBold. Select the Character Color option and set the color to the Red Orange swatch. Click OK.

create a new character style

Step 6

Head back over to the Paragraph Styles panel, and select New Paragraph Style from the main menu. Set the Style Name to Drop Cap and use the following settings for the Basic Character Formats option:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Regular
  • Size: 8 pt
  • Leading: 11 pt

Select the Drop Caps and Nested Styles option from the left side menu. In the Drop Caps section, set the Lines to 4 and the Characters to 1. 

In the Nested Styles section, click on New Nested Style. This will add a new nested style. Select the Drop Cap character style from the dropdown menu. Click on Words and select Characters. 

Click OK.

create a drop cap paragraph style

2. How to Set Up Master Pages for Your Newsletter Template Design

Step 1

For this tutorial, we will be using Master pages to set up running heads and folios. This will allow you to add pages to your InDesign newsletter template as you need.

On the Pages panel (Window > Pages), double-click on the A-Master thumbnail. Let’s start with the left side of the page. Using the Text Tool (T), create a text box over the top margin. Add the word ‘Section’ as a placeholder; we will be able to change this later. Using the Paragraph Styles, set the text box to the Running Heads format. 

create a running head

Using the Line Tool (), create lines over and under the text box. Head over to the Control bar and set the Stroke Weight of the top line to 2 pt. Set the Stroke Weight of the bottom line to 0.25 pt. 

add strokes

Step 2

Using the Text Tool (T), draw a text box under the bottom margin to add page numbers. Double-click to activate the text box, and then right-click and select Insert Special Character > Markers > Current Page Number. This will add an A as a placeholder. Along with this, you can add the name of the school. 

Style this text box with the Folio style from the Paragraph Styles panel.

add a folio

Using the Line Tool (), draw a line over the page number and set the Stroke Weight to 0.25 pt.

create a stroke

Step 3

Now that we have one page set up, we can duplicate the elements on the opposite page. Select all elements on the page, press Shift-Option, and drag the elements to the right page. 

Select the running head and folio text boxes and press T to activate the Text options on the Control bar. Set both text boxes to Align Right. You can leave the page number as it is, or you can change the position to the outside of the page.

mirror the running head and folio on the opposite page

3. How to Create a Cover Page for Your Newsletter Design

Step 1

On Page 1, you will notice the running head and folio on the page. We won’t need a running head on the cover, so we need to delete it. To activate the elements, press Shift-Command and select the running head. Press Delete. 

Using the Text Tool (T), create three text boxes at the top of the cover page. Head over to the Control bar and use the following settings and copy for each box:

Newsletter text box:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 94 pt
  • Set the Character Color to Light Blue

School or business name text box:

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Black
  • Size: 14 pt
  • Set the Character Color to Light Blue

In the third text box, you can include the date, issue number, and season: 

  • Font Family: BW Nista Grotesk
  • Font Style: Regular
  • Size: 8 pt
  • Set the Character Color to [Black]

Using the Line Tool (), create strokes to go over and under the third text box. This will help differentiate the content.

add text to the top portion of the front cover

Step 2

We will use the three columns we created to establish the placement of the articles. For the cover page, we will create a short article running on column 1 and a main article covering columns 2 and 3.

using the 3 column grid add copy

Using the Text Tool (T), create a text box to fit in the first column. On the Swatches panel, select the Newsprint swatch. While selecting the text box, press Command-B to open the Text Frame Options. Set the Inset Spacing to 0.125 in. This will create an inset margin inside the text box. Click OK.

use the text frame options to create an inset on the text box

Add a headline, byline, and body copy. Use the Paragraph Styles to format each section.

add copy and format using the paragraph styles

Step 3

Press Command-D to Place an image. Select the Abacus image and click Open. 

Open the Text Wrap panel by going to Window > Text Wrap. Select the image and click on the Wrap Around Bounding Box button. Set the Offset value to 0.125 in. and place the image at the end of the short story. The margin should be the same as the inset spacing on the text box.  

add an image and use the text wrap panel

Step 4

Using the Line Tool (), draw a stroke to divide the short story from the larger story we will be placing in columns 2 and 3. Use the gutter as a guide and set the Stroke Weight to 0.25 pt.

create a stroke to divide the columns

Step 5

Place an image by pressing Command-D. Place the School kids running image at the top of columns 2 and 3. Resize the image as you need. 

add an image

Step 6

Using the Text Tool (T), create a text box that fits the width of columns 2 and 3. This first text box will house the headline and byline. Use the Paragraph Styles panel to format the text box. 

add a headline and a byline

While selecting the text box, press Command-B to open the Text Frame Options. Under Columns, set the Number to 2 and the Gutter to 0.25 in. Click OK.

add a text box and divide into two columns

Using the Paragraph Styles, set the first paragraph with the Drop Cap style. Set the rest of the text with the Body Copy style. 

Using the Line Tool (), draw a line to divide the two columns. Set the Stroke Weight to 0.25 pt. 

use the paragraph styles to format the text box and add a stroke

4. Using a Three-Column Grid in Your Newsletter Design

Step 1

To modify the running head to a specific section, press Shift-Command and select the text. Edit it, and once you’re done, Lock the text by pressing Command-L. 

For the inside spreads, we will be working with a three-column text box. Using the Text Tool (T), create a text box at the top of the left-hand-side page. Set the head, deck and byline using the Paragraph Styles. 

add a headline deck and byline on page 2

Step 2

Using the Text Tool (T), create a text box to fill the rest of the page and covering all three columns. Press Command-B to open the Text Frame Options. Under Columns, set the Number to 3 and the Gutter to 0.25 in. Click OK. 

Add the desired text and use the Drop Cap and Body Copy styles from the Paragraph Styles. 

add a text box and create 3 columns

Step 3

Create another text box that fits a single column to insert a pull-quote. Add your text and format the text box with the Pull-quote style from the Paragraph Style panel. I’ve added a dash at the end to add more space between the pull-quote and the body copy.

create a new text box to add a pull-quote

Let’s fit this pull-quote at the top of the second column (within the body copy). Open the Text Wrap panel by going to Window > Text Wrap. Select the pull-quote text box and select the Wrap Around Bounding Box button. Set the Top and Bottom offset to 0.1875 in.

place the pull-quote within the body copy

Step 4

Place the Two families with kids sitting on front stoops image by pressing Command-B. Fit the image in columns 2 and 3. Use the Text Wrap panel on the image to add a Wrap Around Bounding Box. This time, set all the Offset values to 0.125 in.

Create a smaller text box under the image to act as a caption. Use the Paragraph Styles panel to format it. In the Text Wrap panel, add a Wrap Around Bounding Box to the text box. Set the Offset values to 0. Use the image wrap-around bounding box as a margin.

add an image and caption

Using the Line Tool (), add strokes in between each column. Use the gutter as a guide.

use the line tool to create strokes in between the columns

Step 5

For the opposite page, create a background rectangle using the Rectangle Tool (M). Make sure the rectangle extends to the bleed marks. Set the color on the Swatches panel to the Newsprint swatch. Lock the rectangle in place by pressing Command-L.

Press Shift-Command and click on the running head. I am changing the text to Opinions.

Press Command-D to place the following images in each column: 

add a background to page 3 and add images

Create text boxes with the Text Tool (T) and place them under each image. Add a headline, byline, and body copy. Use the Paragraph Styles panel to format the text boxes. Using the Line Tool (), add a stroke between each column.

add text boxes under each image and add a stroke in between the columns

Step 6

For the back cover, we will mirror the front cover. Create a text box to cover the top of columns 1 and 2. Use the Paragraph Styles panel to format the text. Add another text box to fit the body copy. Use the Drop Cap and Body Copy styles from the Paragraph Styles panel. 

Press Command-D to Place the Girl baseball team in a team huddle image. Use the Text Wrap panel to add a Wrap Around Bounding Box on the image. Set the Offset value to 0.125 in. Place the image on the lower part of the page. Using the Line Tool (), add a stroke between the two columns in the text box. Additionally, add a stroke between columns 2 and 3.

add text and images to page 4

For the single column of text, create a text box to fit column 3. Use the Swatches panel to set the color to Newsprint. Open the Text Frame Options by pressing Command-B. Set the Inset Spacing value to 0.125 in. 

Add text and use the Paragraph Styles panel to format the copy. Place the A huddle of school kids image and resize it to fit the guides within column 3.

Use the Text Wrap panel to create a Wrap Around Bounding Box. Set the Offset value to 0.125 in and place the image under the headline.  

create a single column story on page 4

Step 7

Feel free to create your own layout based on the three-column grid. If you would like to extend the number of pages of your newsletter, head over to the Pages panel. Click on the Create New Page button. If you will be printing the newsletter, remember that you need the final page count to be divisible by 4. 

add pages as you wish

5. How to Export a File for Printing

Before exporting a file for printing, it is useful to take a look around all the edges of the InDesign newsletter template. This is to make sure all elements are within the page and the elements that need to bleed out are meeting the bleed marks.

Step 1

To export the file, go to File > Export. Name the file Newsletter Template and choose Adobe PDF (Print) from the Format dropdown menu. Click Save. 

export a PDF file

Step 2

In the Export Adobe PDF window, set the Adobe PDF Preset to Press Quality. Under Pages, select All

set the preset to Press Quality

On the left side of the panel, select the Marks and Bleeds option. Check All Printer’s Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings. Click Export. You will have a ready-to-print PDF file. 

check all printers marks and bleed settings

Great Job! You’ve Finished This Tutorial!

In this tutorial, you learned how to create an InDesign newsletter template. We covered key typographical hierarchy levels that will make your newsletter design look like a high-end mini-magazine. Today, we learned to:

  • set up a ready-to-print InDesign file
  • set up Master Pages with folios and running heads
  • add Paragraph Styles to format your InDesign newsletter template
  • add nested Character Styles to your Paragraph Styles
  • add Color Swatches to your design
  • use the Text Wrap panel for text and images

If you are new to InDesign and need a classroom newsletter template or monthly newsletter right away, head over to Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. We’ve got many options for you to explore! 

If you liked this tutorial, you might like these:

Source: psd tuts

Cardi B Enchants In Stunning Fairytale Shoot For Harper’s Bazaar Magazine



Images via Harper’s Bazaar

Rapper Cardi B slays her inner dragons in a tell-all with Harper’s Bazaar magazine. For the publication’s March 2019 issue, the Grammy-nominated star recounts her relentless climb to the top of music charts.

Accompanying her rags-to-riches story is a series of apt personifications of the rapper as fairytale characters. Photographed by Mariano Vivanco, Cardi B is ‘Cinderella’ in a Vera Wang gown, channels ‘Rapunzel’ in a Chloé gown, breathes fire in a Balenciaga dress, and rides a white horse in Dolce & Gabbana.

“I feel like my life is a fairy tale and I’m a princess—rags to riches, people trying to sabotage [me],” she reveals.

She also admits to having been too caught up with the hearsay that shrouded her. “[But] now, I don’t feel like I have the time to please people. I don’t care about anything anymore—just my career and my kid.”

Have a look at the stunning photos of Cardi B as a modern-day princess below.

View this post on Instagram

Introducing our March 2019 cover star, @iamCardiB! The rapper talks fame, family and whether she’ll ever get back together with Offset. Tap the link in bio to see the full story. Photography by @marianovivanco Fashion editor @kollincarter Hair by @tokyostylez Makeup by @erika_lapearl_mua Editor in chief @glendabailey #CardiB wears @balenciaga and @bulgariofficial

A post shared by Harper's BAZAAR (@harpersbazaarus) on Feb 7, 2019 at 5:02am PST

View this post on Instagram

“I feel like my life is a fairy tale and I’m a princess—rags to riches, people trying to sabotage” —@iamcardib opens up about fame in our March 2019 issue. Link in bio Photography by @marianovivanco Fashion editor @kollincarter #cardib wears @chloe

A post shared by Harper's BAZAAR (@harpersbazaarus) on Feb 7, 2019 at 5:44am PST

View this post on Instagram

Life imitates art or vice versa 😊

A post shared by MARIANO VIVANCO 📷 (@marianovivanco) on Feb 7, 2019 at 11:10am PST

View this post on Instagram

Thank you so much to Glenda and the entire team for choosing me for the cover of @harpersbazaarus! Who would have thought?

A post shared by CARDIVENOM (@iamcardib) on Feb 7, 2019 at 5:12am PST

[via Rap-Up, images via various sources]
Source: design taxi

Where Do You Nest Your Sass Breakpoints?

I love nesting my @media query breakpoints. It’s perhaps the most important feature of Sass to me. Maybe I pick a method and do it like this:

.element {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 100px 1fr;
  @include breakpoint(baby-bear) {
    display: block;
  }
}

That’s straightforward enough. But what if my element has several sub-elements and the breakpoint affects them as well? There are different approaches, and I’m never quite sure which one I should be doing.

I could duplicate the breakpoint for each child:

.parent {

    @include breakpoint(desktop) {
    }

    .child {
        @include breakpoint(desktop) {
        }
    }

   .child-2 {
        @include breakpoint(desktop) {
        }
    }

}

The compiled CSS comes out to something like this:

@media screen and (min-width: 700px) {
  .parent {
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 700px) {
  .parent .child {
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 700px) {
  .parent .child-2 {
  }
}

Or, I could duplicate the children under the first nested breakpoint:

.parent {

    @include breakpoint(desktop) {

       .child {
       }

       .child-2 {
       } 

    }

    .child {
    }

   .child-2 {
    }

}

That results in:

@media screen and (min-width: 700px) {
  .parent .child {
  }
  .parent .child-2 {
  }
}
.parent .child {
}
.parent .child-2 {
}

Or I could do a combination of the two. Neither of them feels particularly great because of the duplication, but I’m not sure there is a perfect answer here. I err a little more on duplicating the media query, as it seems less error-prone than duplicating selectors.

The post Where Do You Nest Your Sass Breakpoints? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Source: css tricks

The ineffectiveness of lonely icons

Icons are great and all, but as we’ve been shown time and time again, they often don’t do the job all by themselves. Even if you do a good job with the accessibility part and make sure there is accompanying text there for assistive technology, in an ironic twist, you might be confusing people who browse visually, like the situation Matt Wilcox describes with his mother in this linked article.

I’m a fan of this markup pattern, including the inline SVG as the preferred icon system:

<button>
  <svg class="icon icon-cart" viewBox="0 0 100 100" aria-hidden="true">
    <!-- all your hot svg action, like: -->
    <path d=" ... " />
  </svg>
  Add to Cart
</button>

Or, if the button is really a link and not a JavaScript-powered action, I’ll use an <a href=""> instead of a <button> wrapper.

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